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Grade 8 FSL

French Fiction: Fairy Tales (Les contes)

French Fiction: Fairy Tales (Les contes)

This is still the beginning of our unit on French fairy tales (« Les contes »). Students will analyze narrative text patterns (character, setting, plot, point of view, conflict) and use dialogue to tell their own fairy tale.

Overview

You can refer to the FSL Year-at-a-Glance post for a more in-depth look at our long-range plans for this year. However, here is a brief overview of what we will be doing.

  • Language Talks (Études linguistiques): Understanding and using language conventions
  • Reading Fiction: Analyzing Narrative Text Patterns
  • Writing: Fairy Tales
  • Speaking: Deliver Oral Presentations
  • Listening: Using Listening Comprehension Strategies and Listening for Meaning

Language Talks / Études linguistiques

The purpose of French Language Talks is to help students understand the basics of French grammar, punctuation, spelling, verb conjugation, as well as verb and noun agreements. I prefer to do Language Talks instead of worksheets, since the former do a better job mimicking real-life situations. Where a worksheet might give 20 questions that repeat essentially the same skill, a single Language Talk can cover multiple skills simultaneously.

We do Language Talks almost every class. The exception is if that extra twenty minutes of time is absolutely needed for another activity. Over the course of September to December, I hope to cover punctuation, spelling common words, lexical problems, and grammatical spelling of verbs. As I develop a better understanding of what this group of students already knows and what they need to work on, our focus will inevitably shift toward one or two of these concepts.

Here are some examples of the grammar talks we have done so far. One of the cool things about doing Language Talks this way is that I often learn new rules myself. For example, when writing the date, I have always copied the English convention: today's date is Sunday, September 11, 2016. Thus, French, I have always written Dimanche, le 11 septembre, 2016, with commas. As we studied the conventions as a class, we ended up looking up the rule, and it turns out that you never add commas in the date in French (with one exception, detailed in the link).

Reading Fiction: Analyzing Narrative Text Patterns

Over the course of this unit, we read a number of fairy tales in French and tried to identify any common themes.

Identifier les caractéristiques des contes.

 

Writing: Fairy Tales

These are our graphic organizer models for how to plan a fairy tale.

And here is the evaluation, with success criteria. All of the fairy tales we have read in class are also available to use as models.

Download as PDF (printable): 2016-11-22-ecrire-un-conte

Download for Word (editable): 2016-11-22-ecrire-un-conte

2016-11-22-ecrire-un-conte

Speaking: Delivering Oral Presentations

[We haven’t started this yet. Watch this space for updates.]

Listening: Using Listening Oral Comprehension Strategies and Listening for Meaning

[We haven’t started this yet. Watch this space for updates.]

Grade 8 French as a Second Language (FSL) Long-Range Plans

Grade 8 French as a Second Language (FSL) Long-Range Plans

This is my latest attempt at organizing the grade 8 Ontario FSL curriculum's expectations into units that make sense. I try to develop my long-range plans into a one-page, "year-at-a-glance" type of document. I more or less succeeded in this case, since the resulting documents are ledger-sized. I'm a big fan of the following quote when it comes to long-range plans.

No battle plan survives contact with the enemy. - Helmuth von Moltke the Elder

That sort of summarizes how I expect these long-range plans to work this year. These documents are both very much works-in-progress, and have likely changed repeatedly by the time you read this. Feel free to modify them to your needs, and let me know if you have any suggestions or if you see any glaring omissions.

Grouping the Ontario Grade 8 French as a Second Language Expectations

The first thing I did was to try to find the expectations that looked similar between the four strands (reading, writing, speaking and listening). Most of the expectations aligned nicely, but some didn't match up.

Next, I tried to find a theme that bound the whole set of expectations together. In this case, I called the units "Fiction: Analyzing Narrative Text Patterns", "Media Texts: Evaluating Texts", "Non-Fiction: Summarizing Important Ideas While Reading", and "Poetry and Song: Making Connections".

Finally, as I go through the process of teaching these units, I will have a chance to readjust the titles, and to see if any of the expectations should be moved around.

Download for Excel (modifiable): 2016-06-30 Grade 8 FSL Curriculum Expectations Grouping Download as PDF (ready for print): 2016-06-30 Grade 8 FSL Curriculum Expectations Grouping

Or just click on the following image to enlarge (though the quality is vastly better in the above two files).2016-06-30 Grade 8 FSL Curriculum Expectations Grouping

Ontario Grade 8 FSL Year-at-a-Glance

Here is my formalized version of the grouped expectations. I've broken them down into the following periods and units.

  • September - November: "Fiction : Analyzing Narrative Text Pattern"
  • December - January: "Evaluating Texts"
  • February - March: "Summarizing Important Ideas While Reading"
  • April – June: "Making Connections"
  • Full Year: "Synthesizing and Making Inferences"

Each unit hits on group expectations for each of the four strands, in the order I'll be doing them: (C) Reading, (D), Writing, (B) Speaking, and (A) Listening. On top of that, I've added « Les études grammatiques » ("Grammar Talks"), which are analogous to Number Talks in the sense that I'm planning on putting problems on the board and have students analyze possible solutions.

Download for Word (modifiable): 2016-06-30 Grade 8 FSL Year at a Glance Download as PDF (ready for print): 2016-06-30 Grade 8 FSL Year at a Glance

Or just click on the following image to enlarge (though the quality is vastly better in the above two files).

2016-06-30 Grade 8 FSL Year at a Glance

Grade 8 French: Writing a Fairy Tale / Écrire un conte

Grade 8 French: Writing a Fairy Tale / Écrire un conte

This is an overview of our unit on writing a fairy tale (Écrire un conte). Before starting this unit, we first worked on analyzing fairy tales. The big idea was to write a fairy tale (1) using the four steps of writing, (2) using our understanding of the French language and (3) using the format of a fairy tale.

Strategy Wall

As the unit progressed, we started adding some of our collective work to our strategy wall. The first thing to go on the wall were the success criteria we came up with together. Those success criteria eventually became the rubric that we used to evaluate student work.

We also had an example from our unit, "Lire et analyser des contes", co-constructed examples (which you can find below) and occasional examples of student work.

2016-01-26 Écrire un conte

Evaluation: Rubric with Learning Goal and Success Criteria

This is the rubric we used to evaluate student work. If I had to do it again, I would specify which curriculum expectations were being addressed. Also, because this is such a big project and takes so long, I would have set specific dates for student conferences, and I would have given a minimum grade during that conference. For example, if a student completed their "remue-méninge" and did a really good job, I might be able to give them a minimum of a level 1 or 2 (equivalent to the letter grade D or C). The advantage to this is that if student work goes missing along the way, at least there is a note that we met, and I can more accurately gauge the student's progress.

Download for Word: 2015-12-03 Module 3 Des textes qui font réagir Écrire un conte

Download as PDF: 2015-12-03 Module 3 Des textes qui font réagir Écrire un conte

2015-12-03 Module 3 Des textes qui font réagir Écrire un conte

Example: Barr Homeroom

We also modelled how to outline a fairy tale and started the writing process together. Due to time constraints, we didn't finish the fairy tale, but we completed enough that the students understood what was expected.

Download for Word: 2015-11-26 Remue-méninges pour mon conte (Barr)

Download as PDF: 2015-11-26 Remue-méninges pour mon conte (Barr)

2015-11-26 Remue-méninges pour mon conte (Barr) 1 2015-11-26 Remue-méninges pour mon conte (Barr) 2 2015-11-26 Remue-méninges pour mon conte (Barr) 3 2015-11-26 Remue-méninges pour mon conte (Barr) 4

Example: Kelley Homeroom

This is the same activity (modelling how to outline a fairy tale), but with the other group of grade 8 students.

Download for Word: 2015-11-26 Remue-méninges pour mon conte (Kelley)

Download as PDF: 2015-11-26 Remue-méninges pour mon conte (Kelley)

2015-11-26 Remue-méninges pour mon conte (Kelley) 1 2015-11-26 Remue-méninges pour mon conte (Kelley) 2 2015-11-26 Remue-méninges pour mon conte (Kelley) 3 2015-11-26 Remue-méninges pour mon conte (Kelley) 4 2015-11-26 Remue-méninges pour mon conte (Kelley) 5

Example of Student Progression

This is an example from a student who finished somewhere in a level 4. There were a number of students who wrote excellent fairy tales during this unit, and I really wish that I had taken more photos.

Rubric

I wish I had pictures of the evolution of this rubric over time. The checkmarks that are here were added over the course of several weeks, as the student completed more and more sections of the project. If I had to do this again, I would have left a little bit of space in between each section, so that I could make comments on each step of the writing process.

2016-01 Écrire un conte Rubric

 

Outline

Students were allowed to work in pairs (if they wanted to) on the outline. This allowed students to generate ideas together for their story more quickly and get feedback on what might work and might not work more quickly. It also allowed me to meet with groups in a more efficient manner and help students get started on the right track. This group actually did two outlines, hence the "(2)" in the title.

2016-01 Écrire un conte Remue-méninge 1 2016-01 Écrire un conte Remue-méninge 2

First Draft

Students worked individually from the draft onward, even though they may have generated a rough copy together. This allowed students to have a common jumping-off point, but be creative in how they solved the problems in their own story. We spent a lot of time going over grammar and spelling. I tried to group students together when I noticed that they were working on similar skills (for example, all the students who were trying to add good metaphors), so that I could teach those students what I wanted and follow up more effectively. This student actually did several drafts before handing in the final copy, but I haven't included them.

2016-01 Écrire un conte Brouillon 1 2016-01 Écrire un conte Brouillon 2 2016-01 Écrire un conte Brouillon 3

 

 

Final Copy

And here's the final story.

2016-01 Écrire un conte Copie finale 1 2016-01 Écrire un conte Copie finale 2 2016-01 Écrire un conte Copie finale 3 2016-01 Écrire un conte Copie finale 4

Word Study

This is slightly separate from the fairy tale, but still related. I asked students to show me what they learned while writing. Some students just defined the new words they used (as this student did). Others also added in new grammar rules, homonyms that they needed to look out for, or verb tenses that they worked on. In future projects, I really want to develop the success criteria for the word study, since it really shows how much actual French a student learned during a project.

2016-01 Écrire un conte Copie finale 5

Lire et analyser des contes

Lire et analyser des contes

This reading unit is part of Littératie en action, module 3: « Des textes qui font réagir! ». The first thing we did was read through a couple fairy tales together. Once we were comfortable with the main themes, we read and analyzed « Les affreux petits gloutons ».

Les affreux petits gloutons

We read this story together, out loud, and then proceeded to do a word-study, because the level of vocabulary is actually pretty high.

Les affreux petits gloutons 1 Les affreux petits gloutons 2

Part I: Guided Analysis

In our analysis, we included the word study (see next section), interpréter des figures de style, and the analyse du texte. The latter was done using a three-act structure, although students were more familiar with the five-act structure.

Les affreux petits gloutons Exemple 1

Word Study

For this fairy tale, we did our word study on post-its. Students had to find difficult words, identify whether they were a noun (masculine or feminine), adjective, verb or expression, and define the word.

Les affreux petits gloutons Exemple 2 Les affreux petits gloutons Exemple 3 Les affreux petits gloutons Exemple 4

Learning Objectives

After we were finished our guided analysis, we were able to create a list of learning objectives for this project.

Module 3 Objectifs d'apprentissage

Part II: Group Analysis

These are examples that students came up with together. At the end of this part of the project, we looked at all the work everyone had done, and we added to the above list of success criteria. Keep reading for a bunch of examples of students work. Skip to "Part III" for individual examples and evaluations.

La barbe de l'ogre

La barbe de l'ogre 1 La barbe de l'ogre 2

La barbe de l'ogre: Exemple 1

La barbe de l'ogre Exemple 1-1 La barbe de l'ogre Exemple 1-2 La barbe de l'ogre Exemple 1-3

La barbe de l'ogre: Exemple 2

La barbe de l'ogre Exemple 2

Le château endormi

Le château endormi 1Le château endormi 2

Le château endormi: Exemple 1

Le château endormi Exemple 1-1 Le château endormi Exemple 1-2

Le château endormi: Exemple 2

Le château endormi Exemple 2

Le grand malentendu

Le grand malentendu 1 Le grand malentendu 2

Le grand malentendu: Exemple 1

Le grand malentendu Exemple 1-1 Le grand malentendu Exemple 1-2 Le grand malentendu Exemple 1-3

Le grand malentendu: Exemple 2

Le grand malentendu Exemple 2-1 Le grand malentendu Exemple 2-2

Le grand malentendu: Exemple 3

Le grand malentendu Exemple 3

Les affreux petits gloutons

Les affreux petits gloutons 1 Les affreux petits gloutons 2

Les affreux petits gloutons: Exemple 1

Les affreux petits gloutons Exemple 1-1

Part III: Individual Analysis

In this final section, we did an individual analysis, where everyone analysed the same fairy tale. Here is a copy of the evaluation (Microsoft Word): 2015-11-13 Module 3 Des textes qui font réagir Analyser un conte

The examples below are all somewhere in a level 4, which corresponds to a percentage range of 80% - 100%.

Le trésor et le petit magicien

Le trésor et le petit magicien 1 Le trésor et le petit magicien 2

Le trésor et le petit magicien: Exemple individuel 1

Le trésor et le petit magicien Exemple Individuel 1-1 Le trésor et le petit magicien Exemple Individuel 1-2 Le trésor et le petit magicien Exemple Individuel 1-3 Le trésor et le petit magicien Exemple Individuel 1-4 Le trésor et le petit magicien Exemple Individuel 1-5 Le trésor et le petit magicien Exemple Individuel 1-6

Le trésor et le petit magicien: Exemple individuel 2

Le trésor et le petit magicien Exemple Individuel 2-1 Le trésor et le petit magicien Exemple Individuel 2-2 Le trésor et le petit magicien Exemple Individuel 2-3 Le trésor et le petit magicien Exemple Individuel 2-4

Le trésor et le petit magicien: Exemple individuel 3

Le trésor et le petit magicien Exemple Individuel 3-1 Le trésor et le petit magicien Exemple Individuel 3-2 Le trésor et le petit magicien Exemple Individuel 3-3

Les catastrophes naturelles, Quiz 2: Les prépositions devant un nom propre de lieu

Les catastrophes naturelles, Quiz 2: Les prépositions devant un nom propre de lieu

Les prépositions devant un nom propre de lieu

Voici la deuxième évaluation de l'Unité 1-5: Les catastrophes naturelles. Ce quiz est basé sur les notions apprises dans la section, La préposition devant un nom propre de lieu.

Télécharger les documents originaux

Voici le document original sous format Word: 2015-09-18 Unité 1-5 Les catastrophes Quiz 2 La préposition devant un nom propre de lieu

Et encore sous format PDF: 2015-09-18 Unité 1-5 Les catastrophes Quiz 2 La préposition devant un nom propre de lieu

Évaluation, Rubrique, Corrigé

Voici des images format JPEG de l'évaluation. Les deux premières pages comprennent l'évaluation en tant que telle, suivi du rubrique d'évaluation, suivi du corrigé. Le corrigé est copié deux fois sur la même feuille afin de diminuer le nombre de pages imprimées lors de la correction de l'évaluation.

2015-09-18 Unité 1-5 Les catastrophes Quiz 2 La préposition devant un nom propre de lieu-1 2015-09-18 Unité 1-5 Les catastrophes Quiz 2 La préposition devant un nom propre de lieu-2 2015-09-18 Unité 1-5 Les catastrophes Quiz 2 La préposition devant un nom propre de lieu-3 2015-09-18 Unité 1-5 Les catastrophes Quiz 2 La préposition devant un nom propre de lieu-4

Le passé composé de l'indicatif

Le passé composé de l'indicatif

Le passé composé de l'indicatif

La troisième partie de l'Unité 1-5: Les catastrophes naturelles, porte sur le passé composé de l'indicatif. Nous avons étudié ensemble comment fonctionne le passé composé. Ensuite, nous avons créé des notes en petites équipes pour résumer quand et comment l'utiliser.

2015-09-23 Unité 1-5 Les désastres naturelles Le passé composé 1 2015-09-23 Unité 1-5 Les désastres naturelles Le passé composé 2 2015-09-23 Unité 1-5 Les désastres naturelles Le passé composé 3 2015-09-23 Unité 1-5 Les désastres naturelles Le passé composé 4

Affiches résumé

Voici les notes qu'avons pris nos huit équipes.

2015-09-23 Unité 1-5 Les désastres naturelles Le passé composé 5 2015-09-23 Unité 1-5 Les désastres naturelles Le passé composé 6 2015-09-23 Unité 1-5 Les désastres naturelles Le passé composé 7 2015-09-23 Unité 1-5 Les désastres naturelles Le passé composé 8 2015-09-23 Unité 1-5 Les désastres naturelles Le passé composé 9 2015-09-23 Unité 1-5 Les désastres naturelles Le passé composé 10 2015-09-23 Unité 1-5 Les désastres naturelles Le passé composé 11 2015-09-23 Unité 1-5 Les désastres naturelles Le passé composé 12

La préposition devant un nom propre de lieu

La préposition devant un nom propre de lieu

Ceci fait partie de l'unité 1-5, « Les catastrophes naturelles ».

La préposition devant un nom propre de lieu

Ici, nous avons comparé les noms propres et les noms communs, afin de les distinguer. On a fait la distinction entre la préposition, « à », et le « a » du verbe « avoir ». Finalement, nous avons monté un tableau qui nous aide à savoir quand et comment se servir de « au », « en », « à » et « aux ».

File 2015-09-17, 1 09 29 PM

La phrase impersonnelle

Ensuite, nous avons discuté des verbes toujours impersonnels et des verbes occasionnellement impersonnels.

File 2015-09-17, 1 09 44 PM File 2015-09-17, 1 10 00 PM

Activité: « À l'aide -- La Croix Rouge »

Finalement, nous avons lu le texte, « Tout laisser derrière soi », et nous avons fait les questions de l'activité, « À l'aide -- La Croix Rouge », mais nous avons basé nos réponses sur le texte que nous avons lu ensemble.

File 2015-09-17, 1 10 40 PM

Pages du cahier

File 2015-09-17, 1 11 07 PM File 2015-09-17, 1 11 29 PM File 2015-09-17, 1 11 51 PM File 2015-09-17, 1 12 20 PM File 2015-09-17, 1 13 42 PM File 2015-09-17, 1 14 05 PM File 2015-09-17, 1 14 42 PM File 2015-09-17, 1 15 13 PM

Dictée: Beau temps, mauvais temps, avec rubrique

Dictée: Beau temps, mauvais temps, avec rubrique

This is the evaluation rubric I used to evaluate students dictées on the paragraph, "Beau temps, mauvais temps" in our unit on "Les catastrophes naturelles". This was a written evaluation, where I read the 5 sentences of the paragraph out loud, and students had to write them out as best they could. Students had the text in their possession for a few days before the dictée, in order to get ready. Download for Microsoft Word: 2015-09-11 Dictée Beau temps mauvais temps

Download as PDF: 2015-09-11 Dictée Beau temps mauvais temps

Click image below to zoom in.

2015-09-11 Dictée Beau temps mauvais temps

Unité 1-5: Les catastrophes naturelles

Unité 1-5: Les catastrophes naturelles

Aujourd'hui, nous avons commencé l'unité 1-5, « Les catastrophes naturelles ». Au niveau du grammaire, cet unité aborde les concepts suivants:

Lecture: Beau temps, mauvais temps

Nous avons commencé par lire les pages 106 à 109. Ensuite, nous avons faite l'activité, « Instruments météorologiques », aux pages 109 et 110.

Dictée

Ce vendredi, 11 septembre, 2015, nous aurions une dictée composée du premier paragraphe de la page 106. Lors de la dictée, je vais lire lentement le paragraphe à haute voix, et les élèves auront à écrire le texte à la main. Les élèves auront un peu de temps en classe demain pour se pratiquer. L'avantage de ce type de dictée est que cela simule mieux une situation authentique, car les élèves doivent utiliser tous leurs talents grammatiques afin de réussir.

Voici le texte de la dictée:

Les mouvements de la Terre par rapport au Soleil ont des conséquences sur notre vie puisqu'ils déterminent nos activités. En 24 heures, la Terre tourne une fois sur elle-même. Ce mouvement, appelé la rotation, est responsable de la succession du jour et de la nuit. La révolution est le mouvement que la Terre exécute autour du Soleil. La Terre prend un an pour faire un tour complet autour du Soleil, et c'est au cours de cette période que les saisons se succèdent.

Unité 1-5 Les catastrophes naturelles 1 Unité 1-5 Les catastrophes naturelles 2 Unité 1-5 Les catastrophes naturelles 3 Unité 1-5 Les catastrophes naturelles 4 Unité 1-5 Les catastrophes naturelles 5 Unité 1-5 Les catastrophes naturelles 6

Grade 8 Math and French Planning

Grade 8 Math and French Planning

Today was all about choosing the order in which we want to study math and French this year. The Nelson Math textbook breaks the year down into 12 chapters. One of the French textbooks we use breaks the year down into 16 units. So, after breaking into smaller groups, we decided to order what we want to study, starting with what seems the most important and the most interesting. Here are the results. To download the original Excel file we used to tabulate the results, click here: 2015-09-08 French and Math Order of Importance

Math

Each class (Barr homeroom and Kelley homeroom) divided up into four groups. Each group numbered the chapters by perceived interest and importance from highest (#1) to lowest (#4). We used Excel's autosum feature to calculate the total, and the sorted the data from lowest to highest. The lowest number was our first choice and the highest number was our last choice.

So, with that in mind, it looks like we're starting Chapter 5: Measurement of Circles tomorrow. We will definitely get through all of these chapters this year, as well as a small unit on tesselations.

2015-09-08 Math Order of Importance

French

We used the same procedure for French, and we are starting natural catastrophes tomorrow. Because we will also be relying on other resources to meet the French curriculum, we will probably only cover about the first half of these subjects this year. We need to devote other time to presentations, projects and novel studies.

2015-09-08 French Order of Importance